Calendar

Calendar

OK Boomer panelists
Thursday, July 16, 2020 - 12:00am

Storytellers and experts explored ageism and the fight for visibility (and finding work) in the entertainment industry during an online discussion presented by Hollywood, Health & Society, in partnership with the WGAE and WGAW.

Covid-19 webinar on older adults_main image
Wednesday, April 8, 2020 - 1:45pm

Hollywood, Health & Society, in partnership with the WGAE and WGAW, presented a virtual talk focusing on older adults and the challengers of caregiving during the pandemic. The panel was part of a series of discussions via Zoom on a variety of topics affected by COVID-19.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 12:00am

What threw the topic of over-incarceration in the U.S. into sharp relief wasn't so much the bleak laundry list of statistics that underscored the fact that we lock up more people than the rest of the world—and for longer periods of time.

Nuclear storytelling workshop
Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 12:00am

Writer/producer Sarah Watson (“The Bold Type”) opened the Atomic Storytelling workshop with a quote from the film “Dead Poets Society" meant to inspire students to look at writing with an authentic and emotional perspective: “No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.” 

Addiction & Mental Health panel
Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 12:00am

Screenwriter John August ("Aladdin") moderated a panel discussion on how Hollywood can help change the narrative about drug addiction and mental health. At one point, he asked the speakers on stage to recount something they had seen in a film or on TV that they didn’t want to see anymore.

ATX Festival panel members
Thursday, June 6, 2019 - 12:00am to Sunday, June 9, 2019 - 12:00am

HH&S Director Kate Folb moderated a panel titled “Better With Age: Growing Older on TV” at the eighth annual ATX Television Festival on June 9.

Black Mothers Matter panel members
Tuesday, May 21, 2019 - 12:00am

Hollywood, Health & Society’s panel explored racial disparities in childbirth, and why black women are three to four times more likely to die after giving birth than white women.